Changes between Version 4 and Version 5 of Vijay Jagneshwar Bhatt


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Timestamp:
Jun 12, 2013, 6:08:47 AM (7 years ago)
Author:
UshaR
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  • Vijay Jagneshwar Bhatt

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    4 Hindi and Marathi director born in Palitana, Saurashtra, best known for classic Ramayana extravaganzas with [[SHOBHANA SAMARTH|Shobhana Samarth]]. Educated in Gujarat and Bombay. Studied electrical engineering. Started as playwright (e.g. successful Gujarati play Lakho Phulani) and writer in silent era. Provided stories for silent films, e.g. [[Nagendra Majumdar]]’s Panima Aag, Fearless Phantom and K.P. Bhave’s Vanthel Veshya (all 1926), [[R.S. Choudhury]]’s Heer Ranjha (1929) and [[Moti Gidwani]]’s Gulam (1931). Partner with his elder brother Shankarbhai J. Bhatt in Royal Films (1928), later also distributor (Royal Pictures Corp). Founded Prakash Pics, later Prakash Studio (1933-71), also with his brother Shankarbhai as producer. Their younger brother Harsukh Jagneshwar Bhatt assisted Vijay for a while (1947-52) before co-directing three films with Bhalchandra Shukla and eventually going solo in 1957. Vijay started in stunt films (e.g. [[State Express]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leatherface|Leatherface]]) and in socials (notably [[Samaj Ko Badal Dalo]]). Launched his Ramayana series with the Samarth hit [[Bharat Milap]], consolidated with Ramrajya, attempting a Hindu version of the costumed Urdu historical, rather than the more conventional special- effects mythological, although Ramrajya’s climax uses special effects in plenty. Followed this with Rambaan and a second Ramrajya. Made melodramas incorporating the legend of classical Indian music, e.g. the major hit [[Baiju Bawra]] and [[Goonj Uthi Shehnai]]. Sometimes claimed that his interest in Hindu fantasy movies was a logical extension of his Gandhian sympathies. His autobiography was serialised in the journal Janmabhoomi (1968). 
     4Hindi and Marathi director born in Palitana, Saurashtra, best known for classic Ramayana extravaganzas with [[SHOBHANA SAMARTH|Shobhana Samarth]]. Educated in Gujarat and Bombay. Studied electrical engineering. Started as playwright (e.g. successful Gujarati play Lakho Phulani) and writer in silent era. Provided stories for silent films, e.g. [[Nagendra Majumdar]]’s Panima Aag, Fearless Phantom and K.P. Bhave’s Vanthel Veshya (all 1926), [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R.S._Choudhury|R.S. Choudhury]]’s Heer Ranjha (1929) and [[Moti Gidwani]]’s Gulam (1931). Partner with his elder brother Shankarbhai J. Bhatt in Royal Films (1928), later also distributor (Royal Pictures Corp). Founded Prakash Pics, later Prakash Studio (1933-71), also with his brother Shankarbhai as producer. Their younger brother Harsukh Jagneshwar Bhatt assisted Vijay for a while (1947-52) before co-directing three films with Bhalchandra Shukla and eventually going solo in 1957. Vijay started in stunt films (e.g. [[State Express]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leatherface|Leatherface]]) and in socials (notably [[Samaj Ko Badal Dalo]]). Launched his Ramayana series with the Samarth hit [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bharat_Milap|Bharat Milap]], consolidated with Ramrajya, attempting a Hindu version of the costumed Urdu historical, rather than the more conventional special- effects mythological, although Ramrajya’s climax uses special effects in plenty. Followed this with Rambaan and a second Ramrajya. Made melodramas incorporating the legend of classical Indian music, e.g. the major hit [[Baiju Bawra]] and [[Goonj Uthi Shehnai]]. Sometimes claimed that his interest in Hindu fantasy movies was a logical extension of his Gandhian sympathies. His autobiography was serialised in the journal Janmabhoomi (1968). 
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