Changes between Version 2 and Version 3 of Keshavrao Date


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Timestamp:
Jun 27, 2013, 9:02:29 AM (9 years ago)
Author:
UshaR
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  • Keshavrao Date

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    4 Major Marathi stage actor born in Adivare, Ratnagiri Dist., Maharashtra; one of the first practitioners of naturalist prose theatre at Maharashtra Natak Mandali (e.g. Agryahun Sutka and Bebandshahi) in an era dominated by Sangeet Natak musicals. Key participant, with writer-actor K. Narayan Kale and composer Keshavrao Bhole, of Natyamanwantar group’s production of Andhalyanchi Shala (1933), a pinnacle of Stanislavsky (and Ibsen/Shaw) inspired naturalism in Marathi theatre, prompting Shantaram to hire all three for Prabhat. Kale suggests that Date’s constant effort to reconcile reformist-social literature’s stereotypes with European theatrical styles inevitably led to the expressionist technique of fragmenting characters into certain gestures and a speaking style, construed as an ‘entry into the character’s mind’ (Kale, 1950). Best-known film work with Shantaram at Prabhat (e.g. the classic Kunku and Shejari) and Rajkamal (Dahej, Toofan Aur Diya), where his declamatory speech and gesture fitted Shantaram’s expressionist inclinations. Date’s style remains a characteristic of Shantaram’s influential variant of melodrama. Also directed some films at Rajkamal. Biography by V.V. Jog (1976). 
     4Major Marathi stage actor born in Adivare, Ratnagiri Dist., Maharashtra; one of the first practitioners of naturalist prose theatre at Maharashtra Natak Mandali (e.g. Agryahun Sutka and Bebandshahi) in an era dominated by [[Sangeet Natak]] musicals. Key participant, with writer-actor [[K. Narayan Kale]] and composer [[Keshavrao Bhole]], of Natyamanwantar group’s production of Andhalyanchi Shala (1933), a pinnacle of Stanislavsky (and Ibsen/Shaw) inspired naturalism in Marathi theatre, prompting [[Shantaram]] to hire all three for [[Prabhat]]. Kale suggests that Date’s constant effort to reconcile reformist-social literature’s stereotypes with European theatrical styles inevitably led to the expressionist technique of fragmenting characters into certain gestures and a speaking style, construed as an ‘entry into the character’s mind’ (Kale, 1950). Best-known film work with Shantaram at Prabhat (e.g. the classic Kunku and [[Shejari]]) and [[Rajkamal]] ([[Dahej]], Toofan Aur Diya), where his declamatory speech and gesture fitted Shantaram’s expressionist inclinations. Date’s style remains a characteristic of Shantaram’s influential variant of melodrama. Also directed some films at Rajkamal. Biography by V.V. Jog (1976). 
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