Changes between Version 7 and Version 8 of Gopinath Narayan Devare


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Timestamp:
Jun 28, 2013, 7:16:54 AM (7 years ago)
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UshaR
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  • Gopinath Narayan Devare

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    4 Bombay-based cinematographer and director of the silent period; born in Bombay. Son of the court photographer Gopinath Devare. Studied photography and cinematography in Europe (1918-20); returned to India (1921) and worked briefly in his father’s studio before joining [[Kohinoor]] as a technician in the early 20s, where he worked with his cousin Gajanan Shyamrao Devare, also a cameraman and director. N.G. Devare has been credited with directing films he shot for [[Kanjibhai Rathod]] and [[Homi Master]]. He also shot [[Telephone Ni Taruni (1926)|Telephone Ni Taruni]] (1926), pioneering location shooting at the Grant Road Telephone Exchange in Bombay, and [[Bhaneli Bhamini (1927)|Bhaneli Bhamini]] and [[Gunsundari]] (both 1927). Turned director in 1927. Virtually ran Kohinoor when it became the employee-run Kohinoor U.A. (1928), establishing his own N.G. Devare Prod. in 1933, but the venture collapsed. Several film- makers were apprenticed to him, e.g. the then- cameraman [[V.M. Vyas]] for Zakhmi Jigar and [[Jaswantlal]] for Ulfat-e-Mohammed. Recorded his version of this controversial period in Kohinoor’s history and of the silent studios in the film [[Daily Mail]]. Co-directed a few Hindi and Marathi films in the late 30s and 40s with Homi Master (e.g. Punjab Lancers) and [[Sarpotdar]] (Sant Janabai). His cousin G.S. Devare had become a prominent cameraman with films such as [[Bhakta Vidur]] (1921), [[Kala Naag]] (1924), [[Fankdo Fituri (1925)|Fankdo Fituri]] and [[Lanka Ni Laadi (1925)|Lanka Ni Laadi]] (both 1925). As a director, G.S. Devare was associated with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JBH_Wadia|J.B.H. Wadia]] and later ran a film processing laboratory. The two Devares co-directed the Marathi film Raigad. 
     4Bombay-based cinematographer and director of the silent period; born in Bombay. Son of the court photographer Gopinath Devare. Studied photography and cinematography in Europe (1918-20); returned to India (1921) and worked briefly in his father’s studio before joining [[Kohinoor]] as a technician in the early 20s, where he worked with his cousin Gajanan Shyamrao Devare, also a cameraman and director. N.G. Devare has been credited with directing films he shot for [[Kanjibhai Rathod]] and [[Homi Master]]. He also shot [[Telephone Ni Taruni (1926)|Telephone Ni Taruni]] (1926), pioneering location shooting at the Grant Road Telephone Exchange in Bombay, and [[Bhaneli Bhamini (1927)|Bhaneli Bhamini]] and [[Gunsundari]] (both 1927). Turned director in 1927. Virtually ran Kohinoor when it became the employee-run Kohinoor U.A. (1928), establishing his own N.G. Devare Prod. in 1933, but the venture collapsed. Several film- makers were apprenticed to him, e.g. the then- cameraman [[V.M. Vyas]] for Zakhmi Jigar and [[Jaswantlal]] for Ulfat-e-Mohammed. Recorded his version of this controversial period in Kohinoor’s history and of the silent studios in the film [[Daily Mail]]. Co-directed a few Hindi and Marathi films in the late 30s and 40s with Homi Master (e.g. Punjab Lancers) and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarpotdar|Sarpotdar]] (Sant Janabai). His cousin G.S. Devare had become a prominent cameraman with films such as [[Bhakta Vidur]] (1921), [[Kala Naag]] (1924), [[Fankdo Fituri (1925)|Fankdo Fituri]] and [[Lanka Ni Laadi (1925)|Lanka Ni Laadi]] (both 1925). As a director, G.S. Devare was associated with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JBH_Wadia|J.B.H. Wadia]] and later ran a film processing laboratory. The two Devares co-directed the Marathi film Raigad. 
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    66FILMOGRAPHY: 1927: Be Ghadi Mouj; Sati Madri; 1928: Naag Padmini; Tajayali Taruni; Bharmayalo Bharthar; Princess Rajba; 1929: Baghdad Nu Baharvatiyo; Zakhmi Jigar; Ulfat- e-Mohammed; Mumbaino Satodio; Nirdoshi Abla; 1930: Daily Mail; Baharvatiyo Ni Beti; 1931: Afghan Abla (all St); 1934: Sant Tulsidas; Neki Ka Taj; 1935: Rang Bhoomi; 1937: Punjab Lancers; 1938: Sant Janabai; 1939: Saguna Sarasa; 1940: Raigad; 1947: Ghar Ki Bahu.